mystery repeating

‘He said mysteries work that way. If you want to keep people interested, you can let them know only so much.’ The rest is enshrouded in the vast sunny stillness.

And so ends “American Stonehenge,” one of the most enthralling features I have read of late, on page 126 of Wired‘s special mystery issue (May 2009). Written by Randall Sullivan, the story details the Georgia Guidestones, what the dek claims “may be the most enigmatic monument in history.” Yowza! As a Georgia native, I had never even heard of the guidestones, which are located in Elberton, about an hour and a half east of my grandmother’s Braselton home. Built by an man in 1980 to seemingly instruct survivors of an apocolypse, the monument is part guide, part calendar, part clock and part compass. Yet the identity of the man is unknown, and the purpose of the guidestones unrevealed.

I am certainly intrigued, and can safely say that this issue has been one of my favorite Wired releases. From the mind-bending puzzles scattered throughout the issue to the explanation of the Donnie Darko plot on page 40, it’s all brilliant. Certainly, the quote from page 126 is right… there is something about mystery that captivates us. One thing’s for sure: On my trip to Georgia next month, I’m going to high-tail it over to see the granite wonder. Stay tuned for more mysteries revealed…

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2 comments
  1. George said:

    This reminds me of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project(WIPP). People are trying to figure out ways to keep the message “There is terribly radioactive stuff buried here” readable/understandable for as long as the stuff is radioactive. That’s a really, really long time. Maybe the Georgia Guidestones are similar? Here is an interesting article about the project: http://articles.latimes.com/2006/may/03/business/fi-forever3

  2. liskorb said:

    very cool… I love how they describe their solution as borrowing elements equally from Stonehenge and Star Trek (“size equates with importance”). Interesting how sequential panels have been used since the Stone Age, but you can’t predict which way someone will read them…

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